Cloud Traces and Production Workloads for Your Research

(Only interested in the raw trace data? Skip to the end.)
(EDIT 2015-09-15: added Yahoo cluster traces. Hat tip Dachuan Huang)
(EDIT 2017-08-01: added traces from our IC2E 2015 paper “Using Trustworthy Simulation to Engineer Cloud Schedulers”)

Whenever there’s a new idea for a cloud scheduler, my first step is a quick draft of the algorithm in an IaaS cloud simulation framework – punching out every idea on a production system simply isn’t feasible. The simulator then needs to be fed with platform configuration about system hardware and some type of utilization trace. The easiest type of workload trace to look at is generated from synthetic distributions, but this has some limitations. The traces we work with at minimum contain (a) job start times, (b) a type of job size such as duration or amount of data to process, and (c) a job type such as the instance type other form of constraint. When I speak of workload traces in this article, I am specifically referring to traces of batch jobs with fixed units of work. As an example, for one of our recent papers about SLA-enforcement for IaaS spot instances this means in detail:

  • request timestamp
  • instance life-time
  • instance core count
  • any additional data …

Generating realistic cloud workloads synthetically has spawned an entire branch of research. My focus in this article is rather a practical description of the steps I personally take for developing and evaluating a new cloud scheduler.

I usually start with a synthetic trace with job inter-arrival times and durations generated from an exponential distribution, with uniform core size – in our example a core count of 1 – for all requests. If the new scheduler doesn’t provide satisfactory results with this, it’s back to the drawing board. The next stage uses a log-normal distribution for arrival and duration, as this better models the long-tail properties of jobs encountered in real-world traces. A last extension for the synthetic traces then is the introduction of a non-homogeneous mix of instance sizes – which has been the demise of quite a few ideas. While the synthetic approach is a useful basic for testing, it does not re-create the kind of challenges that production traces pose, such as change-points in user-behavior, time-varying auto-correlation, and seasonality in the workload.

When a scheduler prototype enters serious consideration, I am a strong proponent of using traces recorded from production systems for evaluation. Unfortunately, this is where evaluation becomes difficult. Besides handling the technological complexity of the scheduler, a logistical problem comes up: the scarcity of publicly available production traces. This can be a big challenge for the aspiring cloud researcher. I’ve listed a number of notable exception below, but generally companies in the cloud space either do not record utilization traces over the long-term or they heavily guard these traces and rarely allow the interested researcher a glimpse. If researchers do get access, they often cannot name the source of the traces and cannot re-distribute the raw data used as foundation for their work. This in turn creates problems with the reproducibility of results and slows down the overall innovation process. The desire to protect a company’s competitive edge is understandable, and yet the availability of anonymized traces would spark innovation and drastically support academic research.

Fortunately, there are exceptions to this rule of scarcity. Here is a selection of public traces that we have found valuable in testing the real-world suitability of cloud schedulers:

Google cluster workload. Published by Google in an effort to support large-scale scheduling research, these traces from a Google data center cell have attracted analysis efforts from a number of researchers in the meantime, e.g. an analysis by Sharma et al.. The trace covers a 1-month time frame and 12.000 machines an includes anonymized job constraint tags.

Facebook Hadoop workload. A number of 1-hour segments from Facebook’s Hadoop traces published as part of UC Berkeley AMP Lab’s SWIM project. Some segments contain arrival times and duration, whereas others provide the amounts of data processed.

OpenCloud Hadoop workload. Taken from a Hadoop cluster managed by CMU’s Parallel Data Lab, these traces provide very detailed insights in the workload of a cluster used for scientific workloads for a 20-month period. Includes timestamps, slot counts, and more.

Eucalyptus IaaS cloud workload. Anonymized multi-month traces scraped from the log files of 6 different production systems running Eucalyptus private IaaS clouds. Published as part of a study by Wolski and Brevik. The traces contain start- an stop times for instances, their size and the node allocation as decided by the native scheduler.
EDIT: We added the traces from our IC2E 2015 paper on trustworthy cloud simulation as well.

Yahoo cluster traces. A number of data sets from Yahoo’s production systems. Most notably contains system utilization metrics from PNUTS/Sherpa and HDFS access logs for a larger Hadoop cluster. Additionally provides data sets with file access statistics and time-series for testing anomaly detection algorithms.

There are also a number of papers that investigate Hadoop workloads of specific production clusters. While these studies do not provide raw trace data with start times, etc. they contain summary statistics about the workload, typically after applying clustering methods. Some of them are:

OpenCloud Hadoop workload. An analysis of CMU’s OpenCloud Hadoop workload as well as two other traces of data-mining and web-scraping workloads taken from production systems of a large internet company.

Cloudera Hadoop workload. Similar to the above with data from production systems of anonymous Cloudera customers and Facebook and analyzed by researchers from UC Berkeley.

Notably, most of these traces stem from Hadoop clusters and are limited to data-mining applications. More generic IaaS-type workloads can be found in the Eucalyptus traces and, potentially, the Google trace. I want to emphasize that these are very different types of batch workloads that can offer interesting insights in the behavior of a cloud system under varying conditions. I hope this short reference provides a jump-off point for both researchers and engineers to get their hands on a broader variety of production traces.

14 thoughts on “Cloud Traces and Production Workloads for Your Research

  1. Hi Alex, This is very interesting, thank you.
    I was wondering if you know where to get traces of the datanodes.
    I’m doing a research on optimizing inter-server traffic. So I need the traces of the inter-node communication.

    On my local cluster, each datanode has a trace named:
    hadoop-hdfs-datanode-serve_name.log.

    Among others, it has the following information:
    INFO datanode.DataNode (DataXceiver.java:writeBlock(603)) – Receiving BP-186-192.198.1.54-419:blk_825_01 src: /192.168.1.59:50810 dest: /192.168.1.54:50010

    Thanks.

  2. Hi Arik,
    I primarily collect job tracker data and IaaS instance traces, so unfortunately I don’t have any HDFS-specific logs. The Yahoo and Google cluster traces may contain some processed data on file access.

  3. What is actually a task ? Example of Google cloud task ? What actually task is doing ??
    Plz answer

  4. Hi Rupali, the google trace is anonymized, i.e. there’s no info about the specific applications. AFAIK the trace contains primarily batch jobs. The Sharma et al. paper may have some pointers.

  5. Hi Alex,
    I must say, this is a very helpful post.
    As I am focusing on VNE problem, I wonder if I could get some related trace.

    The trace should contain, the request ID, # of VMs requested and their communication graph, the configuration of each VMs etc.

    Thanks

  6. Hi Chinmaya,
    Trace anonymization typically requires configuration and comm patterns to be removed. That said, some traces have fairly predictable patterns (e.g. certain classes of hadoop jobs). The Wolski and Brevik paper also has details about the origins of the Eucalyptus traces.

  7. Hi Alexander,

    This is a very interesting blog! I thank you for the data you provide.
    I am a researcher dealing with resource allocation and optimization in data center networks.
    I need real workload traces for Facebook data centers in order to evaluate my proposals.
    You’ve already providen a link for FB traces above, but unfortunately, the traces are little bit old (since November 2010).
    A new study “Inside the Social Network’s (DataCenter) network”, published in ACM Sigcomm 2015, consider more recent workload for Facebook DC, in 2015.
    Have any idea how I can find this dataset?
    I will be very thankful if you can provide it for me!

    Bests

  8. Hi Boutheina,
    I recommend you contact the authors of the paper directly. Chances are, however, you’ll have to get access/approval right from the source (i.e. Facebook).

  9. Hello Alex,
    I am an aspiring PhD student and I am interested in using the Google cluster logs to achieve the following;-
    -Show the heterogeneity of the cluster infrastructure and workloads
    -Show how memory and CPU has been is over provisioned
    -Show the difficulty of predicting cloud workloads
    -Show that there is enormous opportunities in saving energy if resource provisioning is done right.
    However, i do not know how to get the Google cluster log and what i should know for me to achieve this. Any help will be appreciated.

  10. Hi Alex,
    I am PhD student working on energy efficiency and resource optimization in data centers. Could you please help where could I get some traces which include workload plus the energy consumption of the data centers including the cooling and other air-conditioning consumption??

  11. Hi Ehsan,
    Unfortunately I don’t have any traces for auxiliary systems power consumption. You could check Gupta’s (ASU) “GDCSim” paper. There might be some pointers.

  12. pls i am working on optimization of virtual machine performance and i need google trace or AWS trace

  13. Hi ajayi

    Just google “Goolge cluster data” and you can get it from the git-hub

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